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Stanley Weiss : It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

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Stanley Weiss : It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

PostAuthor: kardox » Sun Nov 11, 2012 4:07 pm

If the Kurds' most famous son had bothered to identify himself as such, it may well have been the beginning of a Kurdish empire to rival the Ottomans or the Persians. But Saladin fought for God and not for country, leaving his hapless compatriots at the mercy of Ottoman chieftains, British cartographers and malevolent Arab strongmen.


This is what I too always think about, what a shame. Just imagine how different it would have been.






WASHINGTON -- Had the course of history taken a modest swerve, the United States and Kurdistan might have celebrated their independence on the very same day. It was July 4, 1187 -- 825 years ago -- that Saladin, Islam's greatest ruler, defeated 20,000 outmatched Crusaders at the bloody Battle of Hattin. The victory ultimately delivered Jerusalem into the hands of Saladin, the crown jewel of an Islamic caliphate stretching from the shores of Tunis through Cairo, Baghdad and Damascus.

If the Kurds' most famous son had bothered to identify himself as such, it may well have been the beginning of a Kurdish empire to rival the Ottomans or the Persians. But Saladin fought for God and not for country, leaving his hapless compatriots at the mercy of Ottoman chieftains, British cartographers and malevolent Arab strongmen.

Today, the 25 million Kurds clustered at the contiguous corners of Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria are the largest ethnic group on earth without a formal homeland. As the U.S. abandons Iraq to its own devices and Iran rattles uranium sabers, as Turkey cracks down on its Kurds and Saladin's Damascus descends into the unrestrained slaughter of Bashar Assad's, the millennium-long dream of an independent Kurdistan could be the answer to this unfolding Middle Eastern nightmare.

As with many conflicts in the region, the Kurdish dilemma has its roots in the fall of the Ottoman Empire. Guaranteed self-determination by the Allied powers, the Kurds signed the 1920 Treaty of Sévres, only to watch the Europeans stand passively by as the Ottoman army officer Mustafa Kemal Atatürk cobbled together a country of his own, forming what is now Turkey out of the Kurds' promised land. In the years since, the Kurds have been massacred by the Iranian Revolutionary Guards, gassed by Saddam Hussein and forgotten by the rest of the world. In Syria, their language is banned; in Turkey, a Member of Parliament with the temerity to pledge an oath "to the Turkish and Kurdish peoples" was released from a decade in jail -- only to be re-sentenced this year.

With the Assad regime now crumbling, tensions between the Kurdish minority and their many tormentors, always tragic, are becoming a major geopolitical threat. Desperate to crush the Syrian revolution in its infancy, Assad has transferred troops away from the Kurdish provinces to the north, leaving a power vacuum into which two Kurdish political parties have stepped. If Assad falls, Syria will splinter into religiously or ethnically homogenous mini-states, one of which will almost certainly be under Kurdish control. Coupled with the recent emergence of a relatively independent Kurdish region in Iraq, this would create something of a league of semi-autonomous Kurdish states between the northeast regions of Syria and Iraq.

This combustible state of affairs greatly alarms Turkey, which has waged a bloody, three-decade civil war against its 14 million Kurds, claiming 40,000 lives. Although it has supported regime change in Syria, the Turkish government has "an almost pathological fear" of a greater Kurdistan, and can be expected to strenuously resist any attempt at Kurdish unification. Turkish tanks now patrol the shared border with Syria, intent on preventing any activity from spilling over into its borders.

Should that powder keg ignite, Turkey -- a NATO ally -- could very well drag the U.S. into a cross-border shooting war with Syria, with Russia quite possibly propping up its Syrian proxy. Meanwhile Iran, boasting an infamously brutal history with its own Kurds, remains a regional wildcard spinning nuclear centrifuges as fast as possible.

The dispossessed have become dangerously destabilizing. The overlooked can no longer be overlooked. And what was once a Middle Eastern flashpoint may yet become a safety valve for spiking regional tensions.

It will not be easy, but the uncertainty and plasticity in the region today offers an opportunity to secure a Kurdish homeland and remedy the capricious map-making of the early 20th century. Iraq is threatening to split into the pre-Iraq Sunni, Shia and Kurdish divisions of the Ottoman Empire, with the Kurds semi-independent and the Iran-allied Shiites ruling the Sunnis. Iran's economy is in free-fall. Syria will soon have no central control and no choice. And while no country is eager to surrender a fifth of its population, Turkey would do well to get ahead of this issue -- ending the vicious, ongoing war with the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), saving countless lives and positioning themselves to reap the benefits of a long-term strategic alliance to counterbalance Iranian influence. Not to mention, membership in the European Union will forever be out of reach for a Turkey at war with itself.

For proof of what's possible, look no further than Iraqi Kurdistan, a pro-American, pro-Israel and semi-autonomous parliamentary democracy most Americans have never heard of. Nurtured by an American no-fly zone in the aftermath of the first Gulf War, the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) was established under the Iraqi Constitution in 2005, a stunning testament to the success of Muslim representative government. Of more than 4,800 American soldiers killed in the brutal battles for Iraq, not a single one has lost their life -- and no foreigner has been kidnapped -- within the borders of Iraqi Kurdistan. Boasting two international airports, a booming oil industry and a dawning respect for the rights of women, this 15,000 square-mile territory of nearly four million Kurds is the one part of President George W. Bush's "Mission Accomplished" that was actually accomplished.

Building on this unanticipated success, the U.S. should rethink its previous opposition to an independent greater Kurdistan and recognize that the advantages of a friendly, democratic and strategically-positioned ally far outweigh the outdated assumption that the Kurds' national liberation would result in regional conflagration. At this point, inaction is far more likely to provoke continued regional conflict. Whether that means calling for U.S.-brokered talks with Turkey or a temporary UN peacekeeping force, sanctions or scaled up foreign investment, the U.S. should make every effort to incentivize the consolidation and emergence of a single, stable, secure Kurdish homeland.

After a thousand years of turning a thousand blind eyes, the world can't keep kicking the Kurdish can down the road. Somewhere along that bloodstained road to Damascus, the region needs to experience this epiphany -- and soon. The first major protests in Syria began outside the Ummayad Mosque, Islam's fourth-holiest site and the location of Saladin's tomb. Saladin's descendants, it seems, are on the march once more. These Kurds want to be heard. Will the U.S. - - and the world -- listen?

Stanley A. Weiss is Founding Chairman of Business Executives for National Security, a nonpartisan organization based in Washington. The views expressed are his own.


source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/stanley-weiss/its-time-for-an-independe_b_2077126.html
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Stanley Weiss : It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

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Re: It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

PostAuthor: RawandKurdistani » Sun Nov 11, 2012 4:28 pm

I remember reading that article, it's very well written.
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Re: It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

PostAuthor: Qonyeyi » Sun Nov 11, 2012 5:19 pm

I never really understood the whole Saladan thing. At Saldin's time people were fighting for religious empires and not entirely ethnic empires. Empires at Saladin's time were mostly based on different religions rather than ethnicies. Back then you had about 4 big big empires ( Eyyubid, Seldjuks, Byzans and Arabs) and a number of small empires. in and around Africa/Middle East. Today you have around 35-40 nations and even more to come in the near future with a possible divission of Iraq, Syria and Iran. These are all based on mostly different ethnicities.

Saladan was not a nationalist. Nationalism was not really an ideology at this time. People fought for religions.

However, one might discuss that Saladin could have adopted a more pro-Kurdish approach inside the Eyyubid dynasty instead of having the '' we favour all Muslims - Kurds, Turks, Persians and Arabs a like'' attitude whenever there were quarrels between the ethnicities.

Correct me if I am wrong, but i believe that it is not right to judge Saladin.
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Re: It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

PostAuthor: RawandKurdistani » Sun Nov 11, 2012 6:02 pm

Qonyeyi wrote:I never really understood the whole Saladan thing. At Saldin's time people were fighting for religious empires and not entirely ethnic empires. Empires at Saladin's time were mostly based on different religions rather than ethnicies. Back then you had about 4 big big empires ( Eyyubid, Seldjuks, Byzans and Arabs) and a number of small empires. in and around Africa/Middle East. Today you have around 35-40 nations and even more to come in the near future with a possible divission of Iraq, Syria and Iran. These are all based on mostly different ethnicities.

Saladan was not a nationalist. Nationalism was not really an ideology at this time. People fought for religions.

However, one might discuss that Saladin could have adopted a more pro-Kurdish approach inside the Eyyubid dynasty instead of having the '' we favour all Muslims - Kurds, Turks, Persians and Arabs a like'' attitude whenever there were quarrels between the ethnicities.

Correct me if I am wrong, but i believe that it is not right to judge Saladin.


The thing with salahaddin is that he could easily had been seen as an arab. He showed no signs of kurdishness, even arabs and turks had ways of showing their differences.
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Re: It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

PostAuthor: Qonyeyi » Sun Nov 11, 2012 6:43 pm

RawandKurdistani wrote:
Qonyeyi wrote:I never really understood the whole Saladan thing. At Saldin's time people were fighting for religious empires and not entirely ethnic empires. Empires at Saladin's time were mostly based on different religions rather than ethnicies. Back then you had about 4 big big empires ( Eyyubid, Seldjuks, Byzans and Arabs) and a number of small empires. in and around Africa/Middle East. Today you have around 35-40 nations and even more to come in the near future with a possible divission of Iraq, Syria and Iran. These are all based on mostly different ethnicities.

Saladan was not a nationalist. Nationalism was not really an ideology at this time. People fought for religions.

However, one might discuss that Saladin could have adopted a more pro-Kurdish approach inside the Eyyubid dynasty instead of having the '' we favour all Muslims - Kurds, Turks, Persians and Arabs a like'' attitude whenever there were quarrels between the ethnicities.

Correct me if I am wrong, but i believe that it is not right to judge Saladin.


The thing with salahaddin is that he could easily had been seen as an arab. He showed no signs of kurdishness, even arabs and turks had ways of showing their differences.


Actually he did. There are scripts of Saladin describing thourougly his ancestry and origin. But for some reason very little of it exists as of today. As we all know there is generally very little knowledge of Saladins personal lift. This is possibly due to his defeat and the collapse of Eyyubi Dynasty. But according to the little script there has remained, he is of the old Kurdish Ramadi tribe. Originally this tribe was one of the first Kurdish tribes and originally they were settled in Mariwan in what was known as West Azerbaijan. Later they moved to Dvin. In Dvin they were attacked by Turkmen hordes and later moved into Tikrit. And this is where modern history continues his history. So, anything before Tikrit is pretty much lost in the history books. Very little is known of their year long stay in Dvin/Armenia and even less is known of their origin in Mariwan and of their Ramadi tribe. If you know anyone speaking Turkish, ask them to translate this scripture: http://www.navkurd.net/nivisar/aksoy/selahattin.htm
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Re: It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Nov 11, 2012 8:51 pm

Qonyeyi wrote:Saladan was not a nationalist. Nationalism was not really an ideology at this time. People fought for religions.

However, one might discuss that Saladin could have adopted a more pro-Kurdish approach inside the Eyyubid dynasty instead of having the '' we favour all Muslims - Kurds, Turks, Persians and Arabs a like'' attitude whenever there were quarrels between the ethnicities.

Correct me if I am wrong, but i believe that it is not right to judge Saladin.


REMEMBER the Crusades, when the people of Europe were (with the blessing of the then Pope) trying to kill Muslims and take certain lands from Muslims. Saladin united Muslims against the Crusaders and chased King Richard II back to England where he belonged :D

I STRONGLY SUPPORT THE BELIEF THAT KURDS SHOULD HAVE AN INDEPENDENT COUNTRY OF THEIR OWN

I support the aims of the Kurdistan National Congress - as listed in my post: What happened to the Kurdistan National Congress

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=10960

Especially aim 2. Liberate our homeland Kurdistan from foreign occupation. :ymhug:
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Re: It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

PostAuthor: kardox » Sun Nov 11, 2012 10:12 pm

keke Qonyeyi ,
I am very proud of Saladin, do not get me wrong on this. I Know that people back then mostly were fighting for their faith. But he could do more if he wanted, maybe he did, we do not know, as you said not much is unknown. And our enemies also want to erase his memories and even denying that he was a kurd. We need to write our own history.
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Re: It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

PostAuthor: jjmuneer » Mon Nov 12, 2012 8:47 pm

My friends, it was time for a Kurdistan 9 years ago.
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Re: It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

PostAuthor: hevalo27 » Mon Nov 12, 2012 8:54 pm

i think turkey and iran destroyed much knowledge about kurdish personalities, literature and history

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Re: It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

PostAuthor: Bahoz » Mon Nov 12, 2012 8:57 pm

the biggest enemy who destroyed and stole our culture and heritage and personality is persians, they did that when they stole median empire, median heritage and culture... and since that time we were nothing ..
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Re: It's Time for an Independent Kurdistan

PostAuthor: Zert » Mon Nov 12, 2012 8:58 pm

Do not be mistaken, although Saladin fought for Islam, and didn't show big signs of being Kurdish, the Dynasty's Kurdish influence was very clear. Many of the high-ranked generals and the likes were Kurds; there were Kurdish quarters in cities like Aleppo and Damascus; some of Saladin's descendants probably still spoke Kurdish and many soldiers were Kurds too.
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