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Where is the TRAITOR Bafel Talabani now ???

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Where is the TRAITOR Bafel Talabani now ???

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Nov 02, 2017 11:52 am

Treason is an act of disloyalty or betrayal of trust to a person's own government. Examples include assassination of a state figure, fighting against his or her own nation in a war, assisting enemy combatants, or passing vital government information to the enemy. Historically, this crime has been severely punished, because an act of treason can destroy a nation. In the modern day, a conviction is accompanied at a minimum by a long jail sentence and a heavy fine, and may merit the DEATH PENALTY under certain circumstances.

Traditionally, the families of traitors were punished along with the traitors themselves, to act as a deterrent to committing treason or participating in treasonous acts with family members. In addition to being sentenced to death, all of the traitor's property would be confiscated, and his or her family members might be forced to forfeit property as well in punishment. Traitors could not will property to other family members, and individuals related to someone who had committed this crime faced serious social stigma. Many family members fled to other countries with what wealth they could salvage.[/size]


In 1790, the Congress of the United States enacted that:

"If any person or persons, owing allegiance to the United States of America, shall levy war against them, or shall adhere to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort within the United States, or elsewhere, and shall be thereof convicted on confession in open Court, or on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act of the treason whereof he or they shall stand indicted, such person or persons shall be adjudged guilty of treason against the United States, and SHALL SUFFER DEATH; and that if any person or persons, having knowledge of the commission of any of the treasons aforesaid, shall conceal, and not, as soon as may be, disclose and make known the same to the President of the United States, or some one of the Judges thereof, or to the President or Governor of a particular State, or some one of the Judges or Justices thereof, such person or persons, on conviction, shall be adjudged guilty of misprision of treason, and shall be imprisoned not exceeding seven years, and fined not exceeding one thousand dollars."


In law, treason is the crime that covers some of the more extreme acts against one's nation or sovereign. Historically, treason also covered the murder of specific social superiors, such as the murder of a husband by his wife or that of a master by his servant. Treason against the king was known as high treason and treason against a lesser superior was petty treason. A person who commits treason is known in law as a traitor. Oran's Dictionary of the Law (1983) defines treason as a "citizen's actions to help a foreign government overthrow, make war against, or seriously injure the [parent nation]". In many nations, it is also often considered treason to attempt or conspire to overthrow the government, even if no foreign country is aiding or involved by such an endeavor.
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Where is the TRAITOR Bafel Talabani now ???

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Re: Talabani traitors MUST be charged with TREASON

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Nov 02, 2017 10:18 pm

MESOP NEWS TODAYS COMMENTARY
OPEN LETTER TO BAFIL TALABANI

“Jon Lee Anderson of the New Yorker spoke for many of us when he said that Mr. Talabani was, “probably the only person in the world” to have “kissed the cheeks of Condoleezza Rice and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.”

An Open Letter to Bafil Talabani – 01 Nov 2017

Dear Mr. Talabani,

As someone who is sometimes asked to comment on the affairs of our hapless Kurds, I have been confronted with the question of just who is Bafil Talabani? Before October 12, I would have declined the request or referred people to the good folks at the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) office, named after your brother, here in Washington.

But on October 12, I found myself staring at you courtesy of a YouTube posting by Kurdsat. You thanked those of us who had attended your father’s memorial service both in Kurdistan and abroad. You then proceeded to address Baghdad and the “international community” on the looming war between Kurdistan and Arab Iraq.

I wish you hadn’t done the second part. I now want to address you about the Arab capital and the chewing gum of the powerless folks like us, the international community. You credited your father, Mam Jalal, for the “unparalleled” prosperity in Kurdistan and said we had become the “shining star” of the Middle East!

Was it really Mam Jalal or freedom that unleashed the unparalleled prosperity in Kurdistan? If we have to credit someone for the good fortune of Kurdistan/Iraq, I would, if I were you, answer modestly and directly: Uncle Sam. George W. Bush is responsible for that accidental freedom in our homeland and our challenge now is to preserve it, isn’t it?

I also found your praise of your father a bit odd. Let us who crossed paths with him do so. Jon Lee Anderson of the New Yorker spoke for many of us when he said that Mr. Talabani was, “probably the only person in the world” to have “kissed the cheeks of Condoleezza Rice and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.”

Anderson’s comment spoke of your father’s signature quality, flexibility, and you made it plain (in your address) that the task had, now, fallen on you and you urged us to walk in your footsteps. You offered to jointly administer Kirkuk with Baghdad (for the sake of peace) and volunteered to throw its duly elected governor under the bus as a bonus.

Flexibility is the sine qua non of politics. But flexibility belongs to the realm of negotiations, often behind closed doors, rather than public declarations broadcast on Kurdsat or YouTube. Listening to you, I murmured to myself: “he is showing our weak hand and one doesn’t do that on the eve of a potential war!”

Speaking of war, you said that Kurdistan doesn’t “need” it and doesn’t “want” it. I know your father admired Mao Zedong, but I am curious if he ever quoted Leon Trotsky to you? Both have made important contributions to the study of war and both should be required reading for aspiring Kurdish revolutionaries.

For example, Mao taught us, “If the enemy advances, retreat; if they retreat, shoot them!” Did this maxim play a role in your decision to abandon Kirkuk? Remember Stalin retreated all the way to the Volga, but won eventually. War is a fickle business and one should not (and I am not) try to second-guess the commander in the field.

I am, however, curious of your understanding of war. I don’t think you are familiar with the writings of Trotsky. I wish you had known of his sobering observation, “You may not be interested in war, but war is interested in you.” It negates your desire to keep Kurdistan out of war. Trotsky was probably reflecting on Plato’s observation, “Only the dead have seen the end of war.”

But what really incensed me, Mr. Talabani, was your cavalier attitude towards the twice-elected governor of Kirkuk, Najmaldin Karim. I know Dr. Karim and consider him a credit to the Kurdish cause. I met your dad at his house and witnessed their genuine affection for one another to my delight. But you obviously dislike Dr. Karim. Why?

That public dissing has revealed something disturbing about you, your blatant disregard for the democratic process in Kurdistan. People in the West expect nondemocratic dictates from the religiously influenced politicians like Abadi, but not from secular Kurds like you. Besides, once you make freedom negotiable, where will you stop? When you say goodbye to liberty, aren’t you also saying goodbye to prosperity?

The international community that you were trying to address thought Kurdistan had one head, and some diplomats were focused on the now retired President Masoud Barzani in Hawler. Baghdad, on the other hand, had already decided to fight him and was trying to read you—to outfox you on its own terms. Now that Kirkuk has fallen, I want to do a postmortem on how Haider al-Abadi acted in the course of the crisis as well.

While you were surrendering Kirkuk and decrying an unwanted war, Mr. Abadi was pretending he was running a democratic state and offering sugary platitudes such as, “We will not use our army against our Kurdish citizens.” It was the perfect pitch to lull Kurds and their friends. I wouldn’t be surprised if a London PR firm was behind his charm offensive.

Mr. Abadi then sent his army and militia to our border in Kirkuk. When we complained about it, he told the reporters it was “fake news.” He also sent his unofficial emissary, Qasem Soleimani, to pray over your father’s grave. The good Persian then apparently threatened you with an ultimatum that included fire and brimstone.

You buckled. Machiavelli could not have planned it better.

Kirkuk is now under the control of Baghdad and is part of the Iranian sphere of influence. The war that you warned against is now taking place not in Soran where your faction prevails, but in the vicinity of Behdinan, the areas controlled by forces loyal to Mr. Barzani. There is talk of dividing Kurdistan/Iraq into two halves. Your half would be on a diet of “peace;” the other that of war.

Mr. Talabani, here are my own thoughts about what is happening in Kurdistan/Iraq.

Nations don’t come into existence through the deliberations of lawmakers. Most fight their way to freedom. Our referendum was the most civilized (and completely nonviolent) expression of a people’s desire to be free. Jefferson, Lincoln, Tolstoy, Gandhi, and Dr. King would have proudly supported our experiment in freedom.

And yet you called the referendum a “mistake,” and a “colossal” one at that. It wasn’t. Lovers of freedom everywhere in the world should have reacted strongly against those who used force to crush our will. Their indifference has plunged Middle East into a new series of wars. You don’t need me to tell you that warmongers are celebrating our inability to turn our region into an abode of peace.

Kirkuk, the prize that Haider al-Abadi sought, has twelve deputies in the Council of Representatives in Baghdad. Eight are Kurds, two are Arabs and two are Turkmen. In our referendum, Kirkuk voted to join Kurdistan. If the United Nations were to hold another one, it would have the same result. Abadi knows this and is not interested in referenda. What he is interested in is to use brute force to disfranchise the Kurds for the jingoists at home and the greedy and indifferent abroad.

The international community doesn’t care whether we are free or not. When it suits its needs, it may arm us to be a rampart against ISIS to safeguard its own freedoms, as it has done for the last three years, but when we ask for our freedom, as we did last month, its response is cynical, amounting to go jump in a lake. Still many in the West (including this hapless Kurd) thought that Kurdistan, in spite of its internal problems, was a match to Arab Iraq. We all assumed, it turns out wrongly I am afraid, we would display Kobane-like resistance and act in unison. Will we ever?

Your father’s favorite revolutionary, before his reconciliation with representative democracy, was Mao and he deserves another mention. The Chinese leader fought Chiang Kai-Shek who was well armed by Americans. Mao later boasted that captured U.S. guns constituted the bulk of his arsenal. American guns in the hands of Iranian proxies tilted the battle of Kirkuk in favor of Baghdad. Perhaps we need to reread Mao. What do you think?

Iran is an ally of Iraq and a formidable foe of the Kurds. For now, Iranian commanders are aiding and abetting the Iraqi war effort. But they face a greater foe in the United States. In Syria, Iran and America face each other. In Iraq, their tactical alliance is built on the quicksand of distrust and enmity. We are, I am afraid, at the front and center of another impending showdown between these friends of Baghdad. Or the U.S. will simply abandon Iraq to the ayatollahs of Tehran. We will then be classified as collateral damage.

Mao and Trotsky are good to read, but you should also read Thucydides. Over 2,500 years ago, he observed that nations go to war out of fear, honor and interest. The same can be said how they form their alliances. America’s interests in Arab Iraq, for now, outweigh their interests in Kurdistan/Iraq. That is what H. R. McMaster, who is a good student of Thucydides, sees in Baghdad.

I can’t say he sees very far. What I can say is that the Iraq that we face is a shadow of the Iraq that your father fought. With some help, he prevailed. With some ingenuity, we can too. For the sake of the unity that you preached on your France 24 interview, I hope you will continue to be a part of freedom’s story in Kurdistan and the world.

Kani Xulam @AKINinfo
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Re: Talabani traitors MUST be charged with TREASON

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Nov 04, 2017 9:50 pm

Rebwar Talabani, Head of Kirkuk Provincial Council: "No Kurdish military force in #Kirkuk. PUK forces present but not allowed to carry guns"


"No Kurdish military force in Kirkuk" so by his own words the Talabani RAT Rebwar Talabani obviously not consider PUK forces to be Kurdish
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Re: Talabani traitors MUST be charged with TREASON

PostAuthor: Piling » Sun Nov 05, 2017 4:50 am

Hero Talabani is still in the Politburo of PUK which has to investigate about the "Kirkuk Events'. How could we expect a true investigation while she should be herself a main suspect ?
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Re: Talabani traitors MUST be charged with TREASON

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Nov 05, 2017 9:55 am

Piling wrote:Hero Talabani is still in the Politburo of PUK which has to investigate about the "Kirkuk Events'. How could we expect a true investigation while she should be herself a main suspect ?


It should not be allowed - but the Talabani are a law unto themselves X(

Granted that sometime the Barzanis and Talabanis have not got on well but in times of conflict with Iraq the Peshmerga have always united to protect Kurdistan

And recently, fighting against ISIS, the Peshmerga fought as one to protect Kurdistan

Sadly, the Peshmerga were even stupid enough to to help protect Iraq from ISIS, a mistake everyone is now regretting
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Re: Talabani traitors MUST be charged with TREASON

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Nov 28, 2017 10:04 am

PUK ponders abolishing position, powers of party leader

The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) is working towards holding its fourth congress early next year, when it is believed the post of party leader will be removed, and minimize the influence of officials who colluded with the Iraqi army to hand over Kirkuk last month.

According to its charter the PUK must hold an emergency congress on December 3, 2017, which marks two months since the death of the party leader, Jalal Talabani. Less than a week to this date there is still no news of the congress.

Section 2 of the charter stipulates that the party’s deputy leader, Kosrat Rasul, should assume the powers of the leader until a congress is held. But Rasul is currently recuperating from medical treatment in Germany.

The PUK dissolved its own leadership on November 4 and formed a temporary team to run party affairs till the congress.

There currently are two suggestions: January 31, 2018 or March 1. Members of the PUK Central Council have said that they will set a date for the congress if the leadership fails to reach an agreement on the timing.

“We will try our best to give a chance to the leadership to set a date for the congress. Kosrat’s health is fortunately improving. The leadership is waiting for him to meet,” Latif Nerwaye, spokesperson for the PUK Central Council, told Rudaw.

Nerwaye added that “The majority of the leadership and Central Council want the congress to be held before Kurdistan and Iraqi elections because the PUK cannot win enough votes with its current form and condition.”

He explained that despite the urgency of the matter he and his colleagues know that they must be prepared for some major changes in the structure of the party during the congress.

Talabani who died in Germany on October 3 at the age of 84 was the party’s founder and sole leader. Now his party ponders the abolishment of this position.

Mala Bakhtiar, a senior leader of the PUK said in a recent post on his Facebook page: “I lost faith in the position of secretary after Mam Jalal. I have long argued that the structure of the PUK should be changed and that there should no longer be a first person within the structure.”

Nerwaye told Rudaw that the idea of dividing the powers and duties of the secretary general among various officials is more popular inside the party these days.

“This idea is well-supported by the party’s Central Council and other departments,” said Nerwaye. “It will resolve a big problem within the PUK and remove the obstacle for holding the congress.”

Talabani’s wife Hero Ibrahim Ahmed and her son Bafel met with the PUK Organizational Bureau to discuss preparations for the party’s 4th congress.

These TRAITORS should have NO part in the reorganization of the PUK

“The congress should aim for a complete overhaul of the party’s structure, form of work, decision-making, bylaws and agenda,” Qubad Talabani, younger son of Talabani, said in a statement the following day.

He went on to say that they did not want a congress that would aim at revenge but rather one that would “strengthens our PUK,”

Rudaw has learned that Hero Ibrahim Ahmed and Rasul are intend to keep those known as the October 16 Group out of the party congress for their collusion with the Iraqi army and Hashd al-Shaabi militia in handing over Kirkuk last month.

http://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/281120171
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Re: Talabani traitors MUST be charged with TREASON

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Nov 28, 2017 6:11 pm

Please click on photo enlarge:

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Re: Talabani traitors MUST be charged with TREASON

PostAuthor: Anthea » Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:27 pm

Isil/ISIS will return in Iraq, warns former counter-terrorism commander
Roland Oliphant, Senior Foreign Correspondent

865
Bafel Talabani warns that Iraq's jihadist problem is not over

Western governments must help put out the “fire” of the Kurdistan crisis before the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant regroups, a senior Kurdish leader has warned.

Bafel Talabani, a former commander of Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga counter-terrorism forces and son of the late Iraqi president Jalal Talabani, said that celebrating the defeat of the terror group was “simplistic” and called on Britain to negotiate an end to a months-long confrontation between Iraqi and Kurdish forces previously allied in the fight against the terror group.

“Daesh is not gone. That issue is not defeated," Mr Talabani said, using the Arabic acronym for the group. "All you will see is asymmetrical warfare increase - they will stir up racial hatreds and terrorism will increase.”

Bafel Talabani knows all about stirring up hatred

“There is always this thing. It never goes away. It comes back with a different name harder and harder and harder. And Daesh is not finished in the slightest,” he said in an exclusive interview with the Telegraph.

“I am in London to persuade the international community to help start negotiations between the Kurdish regional government and Baghdad as soon as possible - before the situation deteriorates,” he added. “We have to put this fire out to move the country forward.”

So now we know for certain that the little shit is in hiding in UK

The fire he refers to was ignited on September 25, when Masoud Barzani, the then president of the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG)and a political rival of Mr Talabani’s family and party, called a referendum on full independence from Iraq.

Kurdistan had operated as a de facto autonomous region since the Iraq war of 2003, and the outcome of the vote was a foregone conclusion - over 90 percent of ballots cast voted yes.

But the move provoked near universal condemnation in the international community and sparked a confrontation with Baghdad that culminated with Iraqi troops and allied Shia militia groups storming into disputed areas in mid-October.
Isil military parade near Tel Afar, near Mosul, in Iraq Credit: AP

In a few days, the Iraqi Kurds lost swathes of territory including the city of Kirkuk and key oil fields that they had controlled since the US and British invasion of Iraq in 2003.

Mr Talabani believes the episode set the cause of Kurdish independence back at least a decade.

A month on, the KRG's status as the kernel of a future independent Kurdistan is in the balance.

Direct international flights into Erbil, the capital, remain suspended. Kirkuk, a city the Kurds see as integral to a future state and had controlled since 2003, is under the control of the Baghdad government; and several thousand families have been left homeless in what has been described as an emerging humanitarian crisis.

The loss of key oil fields has left the region to the brink of economic collapse. The government in Erbil has already run out of money to pay wages this month, Mr Talabani said.

In a meeting with Alastair Burt, the foreign office minister for the Middle East, he called on Britain to push Baghdad to share oil revenues with the region - preferably the full 17 percent of oil revenues the KRG is guaranteed in the Iraqi constitution.
Iraqi Kurds wave flags and chant slogans during a protest outside the US Consulate on October 21, 2017 in Erbil, Iraq. Credit: Getty

“Everything else can be discussed in detail as part of a grander solution. But we need the wages to be taken care of, people need wages,” he said.

“Its not fair to starve the Kurdish people for the political mistakes of certain politicians.”

Born in Baghdad but raised in Britain, Mr Talabani has emerged as something of a Western face both for the cause for Kurdish independence, and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), the party his family founded.

The scion of an Iraqi Kurdish political dynasty, he headed an anti-terrorism unit of Peshmerga fighters he was involved in intelligence and counter-insurgency warfare alongside American troops for much of the 2000s.

He went on to serve as chief of staff to his father, and has since emerged as a kind of roving statesman who delights in telling tales of delicate meetings and frantic telephone diplomacy with a who’s who of Middle Eastern and international figures.

Mr Talabani insists he holds no grudge against the international community. Everyone, from London and Washington to Tehran and Baghdad, had been “crystal clear” about the consequences of the referendum.

“All the cards were on the table and you told us this would happen. If you hadn’t told us, I would have called them a betrayal. But everyone told us what would happen,” he said.

Instead, he levels much of his criticism at the Kurdish leadership - including, he judiciously adds, in his own party - for bullheadedness and division.
Kurdish security forces withdraw from a checkpoint in Alton Kupri, on the outskirts of Irbil, Iraq, Friday Oct. 20 Credit: AFP

And he reserves particular ire for a number of foreign consultants and advisers who he says pushed Mr Barzani into a “massive error.”

Mr Talabani also claims the Kurdish leadership ignored an 11th hour deal he negotiated with the Americans, who, he said, agreed to endorse an independence referendum if it was postponed two years so as not to interfere with the fight against Isil or Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s chances of winning elections in 2018.

Mr Talabani flatly denies allegations against himself and some other Kurdish commanders of cowardice or complicity in the military disaster that followed the referendum.

“It was a simple mathematical problem,” he said. “There were x amount of vehicles that needed y number of this weapon system to defeat, and we didn’t have enough of those weapon systems.”

“And I told them before the fighting, ‘please at least take care of this.’ And I was told: ‘the Peshmerga are brave.’”

“Well, the Peshmerga are brave. But there’s not much I can do with bravery against a tank,” he said.

He said it should serve as a wake-up call to bury historic divisions, including between his own family and Mr Barzani’s, which dominates the ruling Kurdistan Democratic Party. The two parties fought a civil war in the 1990s.

“We need to get our house in order first. We need a united Kurdish voice,” he said. :ymdevil: :ymdevil: :ymdevil:

“If we lose the Kurdistan region as a region, if Iraq divides us and starts playing us governate for governate, frankly it doesn’t matter who is in charge of what.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/12 ... commander/


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