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Erdogan to attack N Syria, US to pull out What to do ?

A place for discussion and exchanging ideas about Kurdistan issues here, also a place for sharing article & views and analysis about Kurdistan .

Re: Erdogan to attack N Syria, US to pull out What to do ?

PostAuthor: Anthea » Fri Oct 18, 2019 10:39 am

As we know NOBODY cares what happens to Kurds

While Kurds fought bravely to quell the rise of the Islamic State, it is obvious now that the rest of the world looked on the Kurds as cannon fodder

As Kurds died in their THOUSANDS protecting the Middle East and ultimately the entire WORLD from the rise in Islamic State fanaticism. To the rest of the uncaring world Kurds were considered expendable, though they did not realise it at the time

Instead of worldwide acclaim for their sacrifice, both Turkey and the US are trying to throw Kurds out of the country (Syria) that Kurds gave so many lives to save

There is a distinct possibility of ISIS regrouping

US helps Turkey to steal Kurdish land and OIL

And take away Kurdish weapons

As long as ISIS do not make any direct attacks on Kurds, or Western Kurdistan

Kurds will never again seek to save any part of Syria

To the rest of the WORLD

Kurds say go F**K yourselves because you have F**Ked us long enough

A serious thought:

As the US is giving part of Western Kurdistan to Turkey

Will it also give part of Southern Kurdistan to Turkey

A distinct possibility as Turkey has already made many incursions into Southern Kurdistan
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Re: Erdogan to attack N Syria, US to pull out What to do ?

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Re: Erdogan to attack N Syria, US to pull out What to do ?

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Oct 19, 2019 11:36 pm

Kurds need a leader as brave as this to unite them

Here's the bravest man in the world.
Who shook Erdogan's throne in Ankara.
And to publish on the widest scale ...
In all the pages of the Kurdistans.
To say and ask the whole world:
Do you want to see the courage of the Kurds?
Do you want to know the history of the Turks and how they came?
Do you want to watch this kurdish tournament?
Do you want to know how cowardly the Turks are and their parliament
Do you want to watch one of our young people
Shake the pillars of the Turkish state from the dakhal
The Dome of the Parliament of Blood, Murder and The Slaughter
Here's Farhad Anjou Al-Kurdi.
who shook Erdogan's throne in
The heart of his capital Ankara
And as Farhad the hero said
You're going to be taken from our land as it's taken off.
All those before you, who you were.
You collect the nest and eat it.
With your mules in Mongolia.
We will defeat you.
And the flag of freedom must fly over
The land of Kurdistan and its people
Do you know who the men are now?
If the world knew about them.
The Kurds lived and Kurdistan lived.

Link to Video:

https://youtu.be/W2FVx0ese8k
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Re: Erdogan to attack N Syria, US to pull out What to do ?

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Oct 20, 2019 11:56 am

BEWARE

Someone is posting photos of horrendously injured children on facebook

For the first time EVER I have been unable to trace the origin of those photos

I actually remember one of the photos from some years ago, which leads me to believe that all the untraceable horrendous photos are fake

This being the case, there is a really sick minded person out there intent of stirring up trouble :shock:

BEWARE

Of people who want to befriend you on facebook

A great many NEW facebook accounts have sprung up recently and all of them seem to want to be my friend =))

Now is NOT the time to accept new friends X(
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Re: Erdogan to attack N Syria, US to pull out What to do ?

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:59 pm

Anyone wanting to do something to help - PLEASE share this article:

Kurds are spread across 4 nations

    Who are the Kurds?
The world’s largest stateless ethnic group finds itself in one of Earth’s most politically volatile regions

If you can’t point to Kurdistan on a map, you’re not alone: It’s not a sovereign country. But for Kurds, an ethnic group of roughly 30 million people, it is very real indeed. Nestled on the margins of Turkey, Iran, Iraq, and Syria, Kurdistan is one of the planet’s most volatile regions, and its people are the world’s largest stateless group.

The Kurds are indigenous to the Middle East, but scholars and Kurdish people alike disagree as to the group’s origin. Nor do all Kurds share a religious identity: Though the majority of Kurds are Sunni Muslims, not all Kurds were forcefully converted to Islam, some still use other older religions practices.

What is clear is a Kurdish ethnic identity and common language. Those commonalities emerged around the Middle Ages. Since then, Kurds have played roles in the histories of what are now Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Turkey.

But while they flourished and wielded influence in the region, Kurds lost their lands when the Ottoman Empire took over most Kurdish-held territory in the 1500s. And the empire’s defeat in World War I dealt a blow to the Kurds, too.

Under the 1920 Treaty of Sèvres, which dissolved the Ottoman Empire, the Allies planned to make Kurdistan autonomous. It was a victory for a growing Kurdish nationalist movement, but the treaty failed and was never ratified.

Turkey ended up renegotiating with the Allies, and in 1923 the revised Treaty of Lausanne abandoned plans for a self-governing Kurdistan. Since then, the Kurds have made multiple attempts to set up their own state, but their efforts have been in vain.

In Turkey, Kurds are the largest ethnic minority, but face longstanding state repression, including bans on the Kurdish language. In response, a vehement separatist movement still clashes with Turkish troops. During the 1984-1999 Kurdish-Turkish conflict, more than 40,000 people—the majority Kurdish civilians—were killed.

Turkey’s struggle to subdue Kurdish fighters has spilled over into Syria, where Kurds are the largest ethnic minority. While Kurds in Syria have long faced state oppression there, various Kurdish defence groups took over large swaths of northern Syria during its civil war, often while working with U.S. forces against the Islamic State.

In early October 2019, the United States withdrew troops from the Turkish-Syria border while the Turkish military launched an incursion into Kurdish-held Syrian territory.

Iraqi Kurds have endured decades of contention and bloodshed. During the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s, Iraq attacked Kurdish civilians with chemical weapons and a rebellion was brutally suppressed. Tens of thousands of Kurds were killed in the conflict, and hundreds of thousands forced to flee.

During the First Gulf War in 1990-1991, over 1.5 million Kurds fled to Turkey. In response, Turkey shut its borders, and Kurdish refugees were stranded until coalition forces created a safe haven. After the UN guaranteed protection for Kurds, Iraq allowed the Kurdistan Regional Government to govern part of the country.

Inside the Kurdish Ground War on ISIS National Geographic journalist Neil Shea discusses his experiences while embedded with the Kurds as they defend their home against ISIS.

As Iran’s third-largest ethnic group, Kurds initially supported the Islamic Republic. But a Kurdish uprising throughout the 1980s and 1990s was followed by state repression. Today, Kurds feel “disenfranchised and excluded” within Iran, according to Middle East researcher Shahram Akbarzadeh.

Will tensions cool in the region—or will the recent actions in northern Syria simply set up another ongoing conflict between the Turkish state and the stateless Kurds? The only thing that seems certain is Kurds’ continued struggle for a country of their own.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/cult ... are-kurds/
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Re: Erdogan to attack N Syria, US to pull out What to do ?

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Nov 06, 2019 5:46 am

Iranian Kurd urges
YPG to attack Turks


An Iranian member of the Kurdish Peoples’ Protection Units militia (YPG) has urged the group’s supporters in Europe to attack Turkish communities across the continent, including embassies, shops, businesses and restaurants, rather than holding “useless” protests. The YPG member known as Hewin Argesh told Iranian television that protests in Europe against Turkey are ineffective.

While Argesh admitted that such protests and demonstrations against Turkey’s actions in Syria “are meaningful”, he claimed that they have “no impact on the course of events” and urged Kurds and any YPG supporters in Europe to attack anything that represents Turkey. Indeed, he went on to suggest that YPG supporters should also attack Turkish individuals. “Now don’t just say we don’t have a problem with Turkish people. On the contrary, Kurdish people should have a problem with Turkish people now.”

Such provocative language by this Iranian YPG member comes amid a spate of attacks against Turks and Turkish stores over the past month in particular, in protest at Turkey’s Operation Peace Spring. Attacks against Turks anywhere near protests, the vandalising Turkish-owned shops and threatening graffiti have been seen in various parts of Europe, particularly in Germany, where large numbers of Turks and Kurds are settled.

Turkey’s military operation was launched in mid-October and caused international outrage, attracting widespread condemnation. It is intended to push the Kurdish militias such as the YPG away from the Turkish-Syrian border and establish a 30 km safe zone able to house around two million Syrian refugees.

The operation came to a head last week, however, when Turkey and Russia struck a deal to cooperate on the safe zone in return for a ceasefire. The terms of the agreement include joint Turkish-Russian patrols, the removal of the YPG from the required areas and towns, and the intention to find a long-lasting political solution to the Syrian conflict.

The YPG militia is the Syrian branch of the Kurdistan Worker’s Party (PKK) which conducts terrorist attacks within Turkey and has been responsible for tens of thousands of Turkish citizens being killed. The PKK is designated as a terrorist group by the US and EU, as well as Turkey.

https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20191 ... in-europe/
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