Navigator
Facebook
Search
Ads & Recent Photos
Recent Images
Welcome To Roj Bash Kurdistan 

14 April marked 32 years since end of Anfal campaign

A place for discussion and exchanging ideas about Kurdistan issues here, also a place for sharing article & views and analysis about Kurdistan .

14 April marked 32 years since end of Anfal campaign

PostAuthor: Anthea » Mon Mar 16, 2020 12:27 am

The Halabja chemical attack

A massacre against the Kurdish people that took place on March 16, 1988, during the closing days of the Iran–Iraq War in the Kurdish city of Halabja in Iraq.

The attack was part of the Al-Anfal Campaign in northern Iraq, as well as part of the Iraqi attempt to repel the Iranian Operation Zafar 7. It took place 48 hours after the fall of the town to the Iranian Army. A United Nations (UN) medical investigation concluded that mustard gas was used in the attack, along with unidentified nerve agents.

The attack killed between 3,200 and 5,000 people and injured 7,000 to 10,000 more, most of them civilians.

Preliminary results from surveys of the affected region showed an increased rate of cancer incidence and birth defects in the years after the attack. The incident, which has been officially defined by Supreme Iraqi Criminal Tribunal as a genocidal massacre against the Kurdish people in Iraq, was the largest chemical weapons attack directed against a civilian-populated area in history.

The Halabja attack has been recognized as a distinct event of the Anfal Genocide conducted against the Kurdish people by the Iraqi regime under Saddam Hussein. The Iraqi High Criminal Court recognized the Halabja massacre as an act of genocide on March 1, 2010, a decision welcomed by the Kurdistan Regional Government. The attack was also condemned as a crime against humanity by the Parliament of Canada. In 2010, high-ranking Iraqi official Ali Hassan al-Majid was found guilty of ordering the attack, sentenced to death, and executed
Last edited by Anthea on Wed Apr 15, 2020 12:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 22969
Images: 539
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 6017 times
Been thanked: 726 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

14 April marked 32 years since end of Anfal campaign

Sponsor

Sponsor
 

Re: Halabja 16 March 1988 mass slaughter of Kurds

PostAuthor: Anthea » Tue Mar 17, 2020 1:21 am

Halabja chemical
attack anniversary


Kurdish leaders and foreign dignitaries in the Kurdistan Region issued their condolences in remembrance of the 32th anniversary of the Halabja chemical attack via statements on Monday

Nuxsha Nasih, the mayor of Halabja, visited the memorial site for the chemical attack in the city with a small party on Monday.

Countless Kurds were killed and thousands were wounded when Saddam Hussein’s regime bombed the city of Halabja with mustard gas and other nerve agents on March 16, 1988, during the Iran-Iraq war. Many thousands dying later from injuries they received that day.

“We must also remember the importance of the unity and solidarity that have enabled Kurdistanis to overcome so many hardships,” said KRG prime minister Masrour Barzani in a statement.

President of the Kurdistan Region Nechirvan Barzani acknowledged the continued trauma of the massacre for the community in Halabja on Monday.

“The horrors of the horrendous attack still haunt the survivors and their families, who bear the physical and emotional scars up till the present time. The chemical attack continues to have a devastating impact on the environment of the city and its neighboring areas,” his statement reads.

Mohammed Halbousi, speaker of the Iraqi parliament, described Halabja as “resistant,” and praised its people for “rebuilding [the city] 32 years after the massacre.”

Several foreign envoys and offices also sent their annual condolences.

“The #Halabja attack on this day in 1988 was a crime of monstrous proportions, made even more heinous by the use of chemical weapons,” tweeted the UK consulate general.

The US consulate said in a tweet that they “honor the memories of the husbands, wives, sons, daughters, brothers and sisters who perished in Halabja.”

German, Greek, and several other foreign offices sent condolences their as well.

Many world governments have been accused of tacitly allowing Hussein’s regime to acquire the agents used in the Halabja chemical attack.

https://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/160320201
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 22969
Images: 539
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 6017 times
Been thanked: 726 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: Halabja 16 March 1988 mass slaughter of Kurds

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Apr 15, 2020 12:04 am

The Anfal files:

You Are Kurds You Are Troublemakers

“When we were taken to Nugra Salman, they crammed five hundred people in a single room. It was dark and nobody knew who surrounded them. One of my cousin's daughters, named Kwestan, died in a stampede in that room,” said Paiyza Mahmood Mansour of her experience at a concentration camp during the Anfal campaign, a brutal Iraqi military operation launched by Saddam Hussein against the Kurdish people in the eighties.

“I heard Kwestan crying and my mother cried out saying 'Asmar, Asmar, this is Kwestan screaming.' and Kwestan's mother replied saying 'by God, I too hear her cry, but I do not know where she is. What should I do?,’” the survivor recalled.

Paiyza’s story is just one of many that continues to haunt the Kurdistan Region.

Rudaw has collected the testimonies of several survivors to be released in a seven-part series, entitled “The Anfal Files”.

Anfal' - the eighth chapter, or Surah, in the Quran - was the codename used by Baathists for the slaughter. Ceremonies are usually held each year on April 14 to mark its anniversary. Tuesday marks 32 years since the conclusion of the genocide, which killed more than 182,000 people.

President Nechirvan Barzani released a statement in remembrance of all those affected by the campaign.

“As we remember the victims and all fallen heroes of Kurdistan, it is crucial that we make all efforts to prevent the repetition of such genocidal crimes in Kurdistan or any other place in the world. It is also the Iraqi government’s moral and legal obligation to provide reparations to the families of the victims,” reads the statement.

    The Anfal campaign took place over eight phases — beginning in 1986, reaching its peak in 1988 with the Halabja chemical attack that instantly killed 5,000 people and injured 10,000. The massacre intensified in the closing weeks of the Iran-Iraq war (1980-88)
The KRG has provided assistance to Anfal survivors and their relatives, including housing and tuition fees for studies.

The Iraqi Supreme Court has officially recognized the Anfal Campaign as constituting genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, however, the international community is largely yet to do so.

Erbil has also made efforts to secure global recognition of the Anfal as an act of genocide, and return the remains of victims from mass graves in Iraq’s southern and central deserts for reburial in the Kurdistan Region.

https://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/140420202
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 22969
Images: 539
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 6017 times
Been thanked: 726 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: 14 April marked 32 years since end of Anfal campaign

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Apr 15, 2020 9:51 pm

The Anfal files: survivors
recount the genocide


Saadiya’s story is just one of many that continues to haunt the Kurdistan Region

They stripped the men...they had brought many handcuffs, but not enough. We watched them, as they took our men’s long Kurdish belts, and cut them into two or three pieces to use to bind the men. They tortured them until night fell. said Saadiya Khurshid Majid of her experience during the Anfal campaign, a brutal Iraqi military operation launched by Saddam Hussein against the Kurdish people in the eighties.

Anfal, the eighth chapter, or Surah, in the Quran, was the codename used by Baathists for the slaughter.

Ceremonies are usuall held each year on April 14 to mark its anniversary. Tuesday marks 32 years since the conclusion of the slaughter, which killed more than 182,000 people.

But as the Kurdistan Region enters its 32nd day of a lockdown to prevent the spread of coronavirus, commemoration ceremonies are not expected.

President Nechirvan Barzani released a statement in remembrance of all those affected by the campaign.

“As we remember the victims and all fallen heroes of Kurdistan, it is crucial that we make all efforts to prevent the repetition of such genocidal crimes in Kurdistan or any other place in the world. It is also the Iraqi government’s moral and legal obligation to provide reparations to the families of the victims,” reads the statement.

The Anfal campaign took place over eight phases — beginning in 1986, reaching its peak in 1988 with the Halabja genocide that resulted in 5,000 people instantly killed in a chemical gas attack and another 10,000 injured. The massacre reached its peak in the closing weeks of the Iran-Iraq war (1980-88).

The KRG has provided assistance to Anfal survivors and their relatives, including housing and tuition fees for studies.

The Iraqi Supreme Court has officially recognized the Anfal Campaign as constituting genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, however, the international community is largely yet to do so.

Erbil has also made efforts to secure global recognition of the Anfal as an act of genocide, and return the remains of victims from mass graves in Iraq’s southern and central deserts for reburial in the Kurdistan Region.

https://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/14042020
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 22969
Images: 539
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 6017 times
Been thanked: 726 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: 14 April marked 32 years since end of Anfal campaign

PostAuthor: Anthea » Wed Apr 15, 2020 9:54 pm

Everybody was screaming

Raza’s story is just one of many that continues to haunt the Kurdistan Region

“It was the evening when our village was bombarded. We thought it was just a regular bomb. But, it turned out to be a chemical one,” said Raza Hassan Marif of his family’s experience during the Anfal campaign, a brutal Iraqi military operation launched by Saddam Hussein against the Kurdish people in the eighties.

“Smoke billowed through the skies of Goptapa, Askar and part of Kani Hanjira [in Garmiyan],” he recalled.

'Anfal' - the eighth chapter, or Surah, in the Quran - was the codename used by Baathists for the slaughter. Ceremonies are usually held each year on April 14 to mark its anniversary. Tuesday marked 32 years since the conclusion of the genocide, which killed more than 182,000 people.

Commemoration ceremonies did not take place, with the Kurdistan Region in a state of lockdown to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.

KRG President Nechirvan Barzani released a statement in remembrance of all those affected by the campaign.

“As we remember the victims and all fallen heroes of Kurdistan, it is crucial that we make all efforts to prevent the repetition of such genocidal crimes in Kurdistan or any other place in the world. It is also the Iraqi government’s moral and legal obligation to provide reparations to the families of the victims,” reads the statement.

The Anfal campaign took place over eight phases — beginning in 1986, reaching its peak in 1988 with the Halabja chemical attack that instantly killed 5,000 people and injured 10,000. The massacre intensified in the closing weeks of the Iran-Iraq war (1980-88).

The KRG has provided assistance to Anfal survivors and their relatives, including housing and tuition fees for studies.

The Iraqi Supreme Court has officially recognized the Anfal Campaign as constituting genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, however, the international community is largely yet to do so.

Erbil has also made efforts to secure global recognition of the Anfal as an act of genocide, and return the remains of victims from mass graves in Iraq’s southern and central deserts for reburial in the Kurdistan Region.

https://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/150420201
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 22969
Images: 539
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 6017 times
Been thanked: 726 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart

Re: 14 April marked 32 years since end of Anfal campaign

PostAuthor: Anthea » Sat Apr 18, 2020 3:40 pm

Halabja survivors

Medical treatment for Halabja survivors hampered by COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has prevented survivors of the Halabja chemical attack from seeking medical treatment in neighouring Iran amid ongoing border closures.

Hawkar Sabir was three years-old when he survived the Halabja chemical weapons attack in March of 1988.

"I suffer from breathing difficulties. It really hurts. My lungs hurt. It's hard when your lungs lose 75 percent of their capacity," he told Rudaw.

There are almost 1,000 survivors of chemical weapon attacks suffering from chronic health conditions in the Kurdistan Region.

485 of them are in Halabja province. Many of them visit Iran two to three times a year for medical treatment

Sabir planned to visit Iran for medical treatment in February alongside 52 survivors of the chemical attack, but was unable to travel following the outbreak of the novel coronavirus, with countries closing borders in an attempt to curb its spread.

People with underlying health conditions, including respiratory illnesses, are at greater risk of suffering complications from COVID-19.

According to local advocacy organizations, efforts to fight the pandemic at a local hospital are preventing those injured in chemical attacks from seeking the treatment they need.

"The hospital they used to receive medical treatment in every month has now been turned into a COVID-19 treatment center. The injured cannot go to the hospital," said Luqman Abdulghafur, head of the Halabja Chemical Victims Society.

"They need the care and assistance now more than at any other time," he added.

https://www.rudaw.net/english/kurdistan/160420203
Good Thoughts Good Words Good Deeds
User avatar
Anthea
Shaswar
Shaswar
Donator
Donator
 
Posts: 22969
Images: 539
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: Sitting in front of computer
Highscores: 3
Arcade winning challenges: 6
Has thanked: 6017 times
Been thanked: 726 times
Nationality: Kurd by heart


Return to Kurdistan Debates, Articles and Analysis

Who is online

Registered users: Bing [Bot], Google [Bot], Majestic-12 [Bot]

cron
x

#{title}

#{text}